Category Archives: Depression

Accepting Help

It is much more comfortable to be the one giving help.  Accepting help is against our grain in several instances.  If one is the serving type and loves to make everyone else feel welcome – then accepting help can be hard.  If one is a leader type and feels a weight of responsibility than being the one who needs help doesn’t feel quite right.  And again, if we tend to be independent, then, help means dependence.  There are many instances where we can find ourselves resisting the love and concern of others through practical acts of care they want to do to help us.

While Christianity causes us to be “givers” instead of “takers,” there is a time and season for many things in life.  We are commanded to work hard and to be self-sacrificing.  But sometimes it is our turn to humbly accept help.  Humility is a Christ-like characteristic.

Elijah was a mighty prophet.  God worked through him tremendously.  Elijah stood against 450 false prophets of Baal and challenged them to a “bake-off.”  Really, it was about Elijah offering a sacrifice to the one and only true God and proving to the whole community that the worship of Baal was idol worship. The God of Abraham, Issac and Jacob was not pleased with the worship of other gods.  The results were amazing.  Then Elijah prayed for much-needed rain, and it poured.  Not only did God dramatically answer his prayer, Elijah ran a race with a chariot and won!  Talk about a spiritual high!  In all these events Elijah was a spiritual leader.

English: Elijah Resuscitating the Son of the W...

English: Elijah Resuscitating the Son of the Widow of Zarephath (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Then it happened.  The evil woman Jezebel threatened Elijah, and Elijah freaked out.  Elijah fled for his life.  In a short amount of time he found himself alone, exhausted and depressed.  He asked God to take his life.

English: Jezabel and Ahab Meeting Elijah in Na...

English: Jezabel and Ahab Meeting Elijah in Naboth’s Vineyard Giclee. Print by Sir Frank Dicksee. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Elijah needed help.

The rest of the story is recorded in I Kings 19, but in short, Elijah needed some physical things to help him regain his emotional stability, his mental equilibrium, and strengthen his faith.  Elijah was encouraged to sleep, eat, drink water and sleep some more.  Then he went to be alone with God and pray.

Elijah in the wilderness, by Washington Allston

Elijah in the wilderness, by Washington Allston (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Elijah’s healthy perspective returned.

We all need help sometimes.  Followers of Christ are united into what the Bible describes as “the body of Christ,” meaning that although we all work in different ways, we are all important and needed.  Like a physical body, some parts are more prominent, but each has a function that is vital to the health of the whole body.  We help each other.  No matter what part of that “body” we play, in some season of life we will need to help of others and we do well to accept that help.

So let us come boldly to the throne of our gracious God.  There we will receive His mercy, and we will find grace to help us when we need it most.

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Filed under Crisis, Depression, Fear & Anxiety, Grief & Loss

A Story, An Allegory, A Life Transformed

“O God, if there is a God anywhere, you must make yourself real to me.  If you exist and are really what people describe you to be, you can’t leave me like this,”

cried out a nineteen-year old Hannah Hurnard who was suffering both mental and physical anguish.

Hannah’s life was changed in that moment of crisis from someone who was contemplating suicide into someone who would develop the hope, faith and strength to help change many people’s lives through her writing.  A sweet friend gave me a copy of Hannah’s book, Hinds’ Feet on High Places, a powerful allegory of her life journey.  It is a story of a echoed theme of those who have  faced unbearable pain, in some form, and in their time of agony have turned to God and found that times of suffering become the foundation of understanding to their life’s meaning and the means of creating compassion for other people.

Hanna’s moment of crisis is not too far removed from David of the Bible when in Psalm 25:16-18 he writes,

“Turn to me and have mercy, for I am alone and in deep distress.  My problems go from bad to worse.  Oh, save me from them all!  Feel my pain and see my trouble.  Forgive all my sins.”

The thoughts and feelings are so common that at countless memorials with which I was involved chose Psalm 23 which declares:

Even when I walk through the darkest valley, I will not be afraid, for you are close beside me.  Your rod and your staff protect and comfort me.”  Psalm 23:4

The good news that changed Hannah Hurnard’s life and the lives of countless others is that God listens and God cares and makes Himself real.  When in doubt of God’s love for us, we need look no further than the cross of Christ where Jesus gave the ultimate sacrifice to save us both from those things which we suffer through on earth, and for life forever with Him in heaven.  Psalm 23 ends with:

Surely goodness and unfailing love will pursue me all the days of my life, and I will live in the house of the Lord forever.”  Psalm 23:6

Lives are saved, restored and given new meaning and purpose when in that moment of crisis we turn in faith to God and cry out like Hannah did, “you must make yourself real to me.”  In the quietness of our hearts and the sincerity of our motives, God is faithful to not only make Himself real, but to turn our lives around, and give us the gifts of joy despite circumstances and peace of heart and mind.

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Filed under Book Recommendations, Depression